Phrasal verbs-work work work

Many common English idioms, phrases, and proverbs include the word work. Read through some of my favorites and see if you can follow.BeforeWorkAfterWork

Work (one’s way) into something

Meaning # 1: To slowly get into a space that is small and tight.

The glue gradually worked its way into the crack in the table

Meaning # 2: To slowly get more deeply involved in something.

Soon, I’ll work my way into my confusing new position at my job. It’s a difficult job, but I’ll get it.

Work (one’s way) through something.the-graduate

Meaning # 1: To earn money to put yourself through some kind of advanced education.

Sue worked her way through law school as a bartender.

Meaning # 2: To figure out something complicated. Confused

I worked through the detailed application process slowly.

Meaning # 3: To struggle with some emotional or physical pain.

Andy had to work through his crippling depression after his wife died.

After I broke my ankle, I had to work through six months of grueling physical therapy.

All in a day’s work. Clock. 24/7 avaliable.

Meaning: This phrase is used when describing typical or normal tasks that are to be expected in a run-of-the-mill day.

When I became a mother I knew that doing laundry and washing dishes would be all in a day’s work.

All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. Bored-office-worker

Meaning: This proverb makes it clear that it is not healthy or wise for a person to work all the time and never take the time to relax.

Wayne shouldn’t work too many overtime hours. He should remember that all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.

Go/ run like clockwork. run-like-clockwork

Meaning: To happen exactly as planned; to progress dependably and consistently.

The subway system in Seoul, South Korea runs like clockwork.

Many hands make light work.HANDS

Meaning: This proverb tells us that if everyone helps with a large task, the project will be completed quicker and it will be easier for everyone in the long run.

Let’s all help to clean up Marsha’s house after the big party – many hands make light work, after all!

Throw a monkey wrench into the works. monkey_wrench

Meaning: To cause a problem in a plan.

When my application for a mortgage got declined, that really threw a monkey wrench into the works of my house hunting plans.

The devil finds work for idle hands. devil

Meaning: Inactive or lazy people are more likely to do things they should not.

If you’re bored, you should find something constructive to do, because the devil finds work for idle hands.

Vocabulary

Vocabulary Word

Definition

diligence persistent effort to complete a task.
gradually little by little; slowly
crippling causing injury; damaging
grueling exhausting; very tiring
dull uninteresting; causing boredom
wise wise decisions and actions are sensible and based on good judgment
dependable capable of being relied on
mortgage a loan of money to buy a home
idle not active; unemployed
constructive something that is useful
Note: I have adapted this  lesson from lesson plans I use with my students live online. Classes are 50 minutes long and can be done 1-1 or in small groups. For more information please visit my website www.monumentenglish.com

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Expressions with Look

Hello ESL friends!           

Welcome back! Thank you for all of your support and helpful comments, I am glad you are enjoying our 10 minute lessons.
In today’s 10 minute lesson we will continue to look at some more expressions and phrasal verbs using “look”.There are many ways to use look in phrases and expressions. So let’s get started!

What is a phrasal verb?

In the English language, a phrasal verb is a verb combined with a preposition or an adverb.

Look + up/ to/ for/ about/ into/
Verb       +         Preposition                      

What is the difference between…
Look up, Look up, to Look out? Do they mean the same thing?
If not, what do you think each of them means?

The following table illustrates some of the most common phrasal verbs formed with look.

Look up to
She has always looked up to her mother. [respect]
Look into
The police are looking into the case. [investigate]
Look for
Could you help me to look for my keys, please? [try to find]
Look back on
I look back on my childhood with nostalgia. [recall]
Look up
Look it up in the dictionary. [find information in a book]
Look forward to
I’m looking forward to starting work. [expect with pleasure]
Look out
Look out, there is a car. [take care/ be careful]

Here are some more useful phrasal verbs based on look.

They are illustrated below in a business context but they can also, of course, be based in other situations.
1.Please look through the proposal and let me know what you think. [examine]
2.I’ve looked over your memo. [examine quickly]
3.Business is looking up at last. [starting to improve]
4.When you’re in Tokyo, try to look us up. [find and visit]
5.We’re looking to Russia for an increase in our sales. [depending on]
6.The company is looking ahead to a bright future. [planning for the future]

Let’s practice.                              

What words do you need to complete the sentences below?
1. I look ____ ____ that winter with some regret.
2. She has great respect for her colleagues, she doesn’t really look ___ ___ her boss.
3. You’re going to Paris? Look ___ my sister while you’re there.
4. The CIA is looking _____ the cause of the plane crash.
5. I’m sorry to hear you lost your job. I hope things will look ____ for you soon.
6. People shouldn’t look ____ the government to solve all their problems.
7. Look ___! You almost hit that lady!

Useful expressions based on look.     

Try to look on the bright side of things. [be cheerful in spite of difficulties]
He’s beginning to look his age. [appear as old as he really is]
They’re always on the lookout for new students. [search for]
I don’t like the look of those black clouds. [What I see suggests trouble ahead]
I know she’s hiding something when she won’t look me in the eye. [look directly as someone without fear or guilt]

More useful expressions based on look.

She looks down on anyone who is not good at fashion. [regard as unimportant or socially inferior*]
It’s not much to look at but it’s comfortable. [not attractive in appearance]
The office has a new look. [a fresh and more up-to-date appearance]
Look before you leap**. [Think before you act boldly***]
————————————————————–
* – characteristic of low rank or importance
**- jump
***- fearless and daring

and more…

The authorities* sometimes look the other way when there’s corruption**. [ignore]
If you ask for a raise, you’re just looking for trouble. [try to create problems]
He must have been angry. He looked daggers*** at me. [look at someone angrily]
————————————————————————
* – government
** – lack of honesty or loyalty
***- a short knife with a pointed blade used for piercing or stabbing

Match the statements or questions on the left with the responses on the right.

Try to look on the bright side. You’d better look before you leap.
Why don’t you think she’s honest? Maybe. He’s always looking for trouble.
I’m on the lookout for a new job. It’s pretty hard under the circumstances.
You have a new look! Good luck! It’s not easy to find work.
She certainly doesn’t look her age. She never looks you in the eye.
I’m going to use my life savings to start a new company. You’d never think she’s a grandmother.
I think Rob painted graffiti on the walls Yes, I’ve changed my hair style.

Replace the underlined expressions with one of the phrasal verbs. 

1.The garden isn’t very attractive now, but it’s beautiful in the summer.
2.You’d better be careful, or someone might take advantage of you.
3.Try to remain optimistic if you possibly can.
4.Unfortunately, many people regard the homeless as inferior.
5.Have you had a chance to examine the job application?
6.She didn’t want to get involved, so she ignored the situation.

Well, maybe longer than 10 minutes, but a great way to build your vocabulary list.

See you again soon.

Scott

Note: I have adapted my 10 minute lessons from lesson plans I use with my students live online. Classes are 50 minutes long and can be done 1-1 or in small groups. For more information please visit my website www.monumentenglish.com

Register for a free demo