About Scott

Hello, I am an ESL teacher and the founder of Monument English, an English school in Italy which has courses both in-class and online and where we teach students from all around the world English. Check out our website to learn more.

Time expressions

Hi there! time
In today’s blog we are going to look at expressions we use to talk about time and periods of time.
Topic – Time expressions and phrasal verbs
Level A2

in a while / after a while… after a short period of time

doing homework

Sam said that he was almost done with his homework and could go outside to play in a little while.
Mrs Lee was complaining about a headache, but after a while it disappeared.

sooner or later / one of these days…eventually, at some future time

travel 7

It seems like it’s been raining for days, but it’ll stop sooner or later.
One of these days I want to take a trip to Canada, but I don’t know when I’ll have the time.

for a while… for a short period of timerain

I’m in a hurry, but I can visit for a while.

This morning it rained for a short while before the sun appeared.

for the time being / for now… temporarily, (not forever it can change)old car

We’ll have to keep our old car for the time being until we can afford to buy a new one.
Even though Joyce is very unhappy with conditions at her job, she has to continue working there for now.

for good / for keeps…permanently, forevercoffee

Mrs Jones has left her unfaithful husband for good and will soon file for divorce.
Daisy wants to stop drinking coffee for keeps  because she thinks it’s bad for her health.

over and over (again) / time and time again / time after time…repeatedlylisten to music

Jill likes the new jazz CD so much that she listens to it over and over again.
The baby tries to climb up into the chair time and time again.
I’ve told you time after time not to run into the street without looking both ways.

…from time to time / every so often / once in a while…occasionally, sometimes sleep

From time to time wild animals come into our backyard searching for food.

Every so often I forget to call my parents on Sunday evening.

Once in a while Joe likes to sleep late in the morning.

in time (to)…before the appointed time …on time…exactly at the appointed time / punctually.yes man

The Smiths left for the lecture early so they’d arrive in time for good seats.                                                                                                                                     Fred thought he’d be late for class, but he managed to get there on time.

Exercise

Fill in the blank with the missing part of the idiom

1.For the time _____, Kim has no intention of selling her apartment.
2.Sooner or _____ we all have to decide what we want to do in life.
3.I like to get away from everyone and be alone from _____ to time.
4.Our neighbor’s dog barks _____ and time again. Doesn’t it ever get tired?
5.One of these _____, I’ll be able to spend more time with you and the children.
6.Carlos heard a strange ringing sound in his ear for a _____.
7._____ a short while, the ringing in his ear stopped.
8.George tried to reach Sue over and _____, but there was no answer.
9.Soon I’m going to lose all this extra weight _____ good.
10.Mr. Jones rushed to the station but didn’t get there in _____ to catch his train.

Conversation

1.Are there any stores in your neighborhood that are open around the clock?
2.Is there any favorite place you visit time after time?
3.Name something unusual or interesting you’d like to do one of these days.
4.Is there a bad habit that you’ve already quit for good? Is there any other bad habit you’d like to quit once and for all?
5.For the time being, what is your main goal in life?
The end
Note: I have adapted this  lesson from lesson plans I use with students in our live online sessions. Classes are 50 minutes long and can be done 1-1 or in small groups. For more information please visit my website www.monumentenglish.com

Register for a free demo

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Online lessons ” English for nursing”, 1-1 or in groups

nursing-staff-

Monument English is pleased to announce a new partnership with Simply Health Recruitment – a leading healthcare recruitment agency specializing in international Hiring.

As well as  recruitment of  nurses and doctors for  UK and Northern Ireland, Monument English holds specialized online English courses for nurses and doctors  needing  to improve their English. Our services include language screening, teaching, language test preparation and test facilitation. Monument English  has firmly established itself as a specialist provider of medical English to healthcare professionals across Europe.

Our Nursing course is designed to improve the communication skills and specialist English language knowledge of healthcare professionals, enabling them to work more confidently and effectively. With an emphasis on listening and speaking, the course covers core areas of nursing such as patient admission, taking medical specimens, patient handover, post-operation assessment and discharge planning. Authentic tasks and activities based on everyday nursing scenarios – from dealing with patients in pain to discussing lifestyle changes – make the course relevant and motivating. 

For more information or to have a free demo lesson and English assessment, contact us!

Scottnelson@monumentenglish.com or scott@simplyhealthrecruitment.com

Phrasal verbs-work work work

Many common English idioms, phrases, and proverbs include the word work. Read through some of my favorites and see if you can follow.

Monument English

Many common English idioms, phrases, and proverbs include the word work. Read through some of my favorites and see if you can follow.BeforeWorkAfterWork

Work (one’s way) into something

Meaning # 1: To slowly get into a space that is small and tight.

The glue gradually worked its way into the crack in the table

Meaning # 2: To slowly get more deeply involved in something.

Soon, I’ll work my way into my confusing new position at my job. It’s a difficult job, but I’ll get it.

Work (one’s way) through something.the-graduate

Meaning # 1: To earn money to put yourself through some kind of advanced education.

Sue worked her way through law school as a bartender.

Meaning # 2: To figure out something complicated. Confused

I worked through the detailed application process slowly.

Meaning # 3: To struggle with some emotional or physical pain.

Andy had to work through his crippling…

View original post 391 more words

Using idioms in business

A great lesson to learn some new Business Idioms and phrases.

Monument English

yes man

Topic -Business idioms

Level – Intermediate

Whether we like it or not, the English speaking workplace is overflowing with idioms. Are you trying to “climb the corporate ladder”? Is the “rat race” making you crazy? If your project is in trouble, who will “bail you out”? Will you “pass the buck” if your project fails?Confused? You’re not alone. Read on about the meanings and origins of some of the most common business idioms.

Meanings corporate ladder

Climb the corporate ladder – to move up in the hierarchy of a corporation.
Rat race – the fierce struggle for success in the world of business.
Bail someone out – to rescue someone from trouble or difficulty.
Pass the Buck – to blame someone or make them responsible for something you should deal with yourself.
Now let’s look at some more idioms that you can use in…

View original post 920 more words

Time expressions

Hi there! time
In today’s blog we are going to look at expressions we use to talk about time and periods of time.
Topic – Time expressions and phrasal verbs
Level A2

in a while / after a while… after a short period of time

doing homework

Sam said that he was almost done with his homework and could go outside to play in a little while.
Mrs Lee was complaining about a headache, but after a while it disappeared.

sooner or later / one of these days…eventually, at some future time

travel 7

It seems like it’s been raining for days, but it’ll stop sooner or later.
One of these days I want to take a trip to Canada, but I don’t know when I’ll have the time.

for a while… for a short period of timerain

I’m in a hurry, but I can visit for a while.

This morning it rained for a short while before the sun appeared.

for the time being / for now… temporarily, (not forever it can change)old car

We’ll have to keep our old car for the time being until we can afford to buy a new one.
Even though Joyce is very unhappy with conditions at her job, she has to continue working there for now.

for good / for keeps…permanently, forevercoffee

Mrs Jones has left her unfaithful husband for good and will soon file for divorce.
Daisy wants to stop drinking coffee for keeps  because she thinks it’s bad for her health.

over and over (again) / time and time again / time after time…repeatedlylisten to music

Jill likes the new jazz CD so much that she listens to it over and over again.
The baby tries to climb up into the chair time and time again.
I’ve told you time after time not to run into the street without looking both ways.

…from time to time / every so often / once in a while…occasionally, sometimes sleep

From time to time wild animals come into our backyard searching for food.

Every so often I forget to call my parents on Sunday evening.

Once in a while Joe likes to sleep late in the morning.

in time (to)…before the appointed time …on time…exactly at the appointed time / punctually.yes man

The Smiths left for the lecture early so they’d arrive in time for good seats.                                                                                                                                     Fred thought he’d be late for class, but he managed to get there on time.

Exercise

Fill in the blank with the missing part of the idiom

1.For the time _____, Kim has no intention of selling her apartment.
2.Sooner or _____ we all have to decide what we want to do in life.
3.I like to get away from everyone and be alone from _____ to time.
4.Our neighbor’s dog barks _____ and time again. Doesn’t it ever get tired?
5.One of these _____, I’ll be able to spend more time with you and the children.
6.Carlos heard a strange ringing sound in his ear for a _____.
7._____ a short while, the ringing in his ear stopped.
8.George tried to reach Sue over and _____, but there was no answer.
9.Soon I’m going to lose all this extra weight _____ good.
10.Mr. Jones rushed to the station but didn’t get there in _____ to catch his train.

Conversation

1.Are there any stores in your neighborhood that are open around the clock?
2.Is there any favorite place you visit time after time?
3.Name something unusual or interesting you’d like to do one of these days.
4.Is there a bad habit that you’ve already quit for good? Is there any other bad habit you’d like to quit once and for all?
5.For the time being, what is your main goal in life?
The end
Note: I have adapted this  lesson from lesson plans I use with students in our live online sessions. Classes are 50 minutes long and can be done 1-1 or in small groups. For more information please visit my website www.monumentenglish.com

Register for a free demo

How to give a speech

Topic – Business

Level – B1

Warm up Photo of Martin Luther King Jr. Orator

What is your biggest fear?

How do you help yourself deal with your fear?

If hypnotism could help you forget your fear, would you be willing to try it?

Public Speaking

The number one fear that most people share is public speaking. Some people would rather die than speak in front of a crowd. About one in every 5 people has a fear of speaking in front of a group. The biggest issue with this fear is that public speaking is a very common thing in our society and it’s hard to get away from doing it.

When people have to speak on a stage, they get nervous and get butterflies in their stomach. Their palms start to sweat and their knees tremble. They can hear their own wavering voice, further making them feel self-conscious.

Questionsmartin l

Have you ever spoken in front of a lot of people? Share your experience.

How do you usually prepare for giving a speech?

What do you think is the most difficult thing to do when giving a speech?

Vocabulary

self-conscious – worried and embarrassed about what you look like or what other people think of you

jargon  -words and expressions used in a particular profession or by a particular group of people, which are difficult for other people to understand

acronym – a word made up from the first letters of the name of something, such as an organization; for example, NATO is an acronym for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization

conservative – not very modern; traditional

funeral – a religious ceremony for someone who has died

periodically – happening a number of times, usually at regular times

elaborate – to give more details or new information about something

gesture – a movement of part of your body, especially your hands or head, to show what you mean or how you feel

Knowing the-kings-speech-movie-photo-01

Whenever you have to give a speech, make sure you know the subject that you are going to talk about very well. This way you will not be surprised by any questions that your audience throws at you. If you feel like there are areas of the topic which are unfamiliar to you, then have someone who is more knowledgeable help you prepare.

Unless you are sure that your audience is familiar with the subject you are talking about, don’t allow your speech to be full of jargon or acronyms. Only go into technical details when you are explaining a question, or you will bore your audience to death.

Questions

Have you ever had a very awkward moment during one of your speeches? What happened?

Have you ever given a speech without preparing for it first?  What was the result?

What are some things you can do to help you remember your speech when you are on stage?

Preparation steve-jobs-speech-techniques-588x391

It’s very important to know about the crowd that you will be speaking to. You will understand better what to say and what not to say by researching the type of audience you will have. For example, if you were speaking at a conservative funeral, you wouldn’t crack any jokes or otherwise try to be funny, would you?

Place a friend or colleague in the audience to help your confidence. You can periodically look at them instead of staring blankly into a sea of unfamiliar faces.

Small details

Your speech should be divided into 3 parts: an introduction, body, and conclusion. Don’t simply read through your speech; instead, have bullet points and elaborate on them. Remember to insert reminders in your notes like “look up” or “make eye contact.” It’s okay to use your hands when giving a speech; body gestures will make your speech livelier.

Get to know the equipment that you will be dealing with so you will understand how everything works. That way, if there is a problem, you won’t panic and you’ll know what to do to fix it.

Questions speech

What types of equipment are commonly used by people who are giving a speech? What are the pros and cons of these pieces of equipment?

How do you feel when the speaker you are listening to just reads his/her notes and never looks at the audience?

Do you have any good tips about public speaking that you can share with us?

Multiple choice

I can never understand Jeff when he starts using _______ to talk about computer programming.

1.  acronym    2.  funeral    3.  jargon    4.  self-conscious

I always feel _________ about my height when I stand around tall people.

1.  conservative                               2.  periodically

3.  self-conscious                            4.  funeral

Her body _______ were telling me to leave the room as soon as I could.

1.  gestures    2.  elaborate    3.  periodically    4.  acronym

Can you please _________ a little more on the subject of public speaking skills?

1.  elaborate    2.  self-conscious    3.  periodically    4.  acronym

I don’t like to go to _________, they always make me feel depressed.

1.  conservative    2.  gestures    3.  funerals    4.  jargon

The end

If you enjoyed this lesson then you’ll love our online lessons. Held in real time, with mother tongue English teachers, 1-1 or in small groups using WizIQ interactive classrooms. Visit our website and sign up for a free demo lesson.

Register for a free demo

Using idioms in business

yes man

Topic -Business idioms

Level – Intermediate

Whether we like it or not, the English speaking workplace is overflowing with idioms. Are you trying to “climb the corporate ladder”? Is the “rat race” making you crazy? If your project is in trouble, who will “bail you out”? Will you “pass the buck” if your project fails?Confused? You’re not alone. Read on about the meanings and origins of some of the most common business idioms.

Meanings corporate ladder

Climb the corporate ladder – to move up in the hierarchy of a corporation.
Rat race – the fierce struggle for success in the world of business.
Bail someone out – to rescue someone from trouble or difficulty.
Pass the Buck – to blame someone or make them responsible for something you should deal with yourself.
Now let’s look at some more idioms that you can use in business settings!

Bite the bullet bite the bullet

-to make yourself do or accept something that is difficult or unpleasant.
Example: When the economy began to worsen, many executives bit the bullet and took a pay cut
History: This idiom dates back to earlier periods in the military when patients on the battlefield would have to bite down on a bullet to distract them from a painful surgery with no anesthetic.

Brownie pointsbrownnose

-recognition or praise for doing something good or for giving a compliment to someone in authority (such as your boss)

Example: Martha scored brownie points with her team leader when she offered to stay late and finish the project.

History: The Brownies are the youngest members of the Girl Scouts organization, in which girls do good deeds to earn badges (for example, helping the elderly). This phrase is sometimes used negatively to describe a suck-up.

Discussion

How do you deal with coworkers who focus more on scoring brownie points than on the actual quality or amount of their work?
Can you give an example of a time when you had to bite the bullet at work?  What was the outcome?
Have you ever had to bail a coworker or superior out?  What had he/she done, and what did you do to save him/her?

Jump the gunjump the gun

-to begin to do something before you should (for example, before you have all of the information required to make a good decision or take the correct action)
Example: Mark really jumped the gun when he accused Larry of stealing his marketing ideas! It turns out that Larry proposed that advertising campaign over a month ago.
History: In a track and field race, a small gun – called a “starter’s pistol” – is fired to tell the runners when to begin. If a runner leaves the starting line before the gun is fired, he has “jumped the gun.”

Pull the plugpull_the_plug

-to stop an activity or project, especially if it is prohibited or if it is not succeeding

Example:  When the boss found out that the project was $40 million over budget, he pulled the plug and fired the project manager.

History: This expression is believed to refer to one of two different actions. First, if the plug for an electrical appliance is removed from the wall, the appliance will no longer work (it stops). Secondly, in the 19th century, some of the first toilets in use had a plug. This plug was removed to flush the toilet.

Down to the wiredown to the wire

-until the very last moment that it is possible to do something (note: the phrase “the 11th hour” is very similar – it means “the last minute”)

Example: Our end of the year report is due at 4:00 pm today. I was out sick all week with the flu, so now I’m really going to have to work down to the wire.

History: This term comes from the sport of equestrian racing. In the 19th century, a wire above the finish line was used to decide who the winner of a close race was. If two horses were very close together at the end of the race, it was said to be “down to the wire” (the one who touched it first was the winner).

Discussion

If you see a business situation deteriorating quickly, do you think it’s a better idea to pull the plug on the project yourself or pass the buck to someone else? Why?
Give an example of a time when a well known company jumped the gun.
Do you prefer to finish things early or do you normally work down to the wire?

Compare apples to orangesapples and organges

-to compare two things that are not similar, making the comparison worthless

Example: You can’t compare Japan’s economy to the economy of the U.S. It’s like comparing apples to oranges!

Note: If you wanted to compare two things that are very similar, you would say “compare apples to apples.”

For example: For today’s meeting, I think it’s important to compare apples to apples. We should compare this month’s sales figures to the sales figures from the same month last year.

Yes manyes man

-someone who always agrees with everything that an authority figure (such as a boss, teacher, parent, etc.) proposes

Example: Bob is such a yes man; there’s no way he’ll ever disagree with his manager.

Note: As you can imagine, the term “yes man” comes from the fact that some people will always say “yes” to their bosses, teachers, etc. in order to be well liked by those people.

Larry will never tell his boss how he really feels about this project.  He’s just a __________________.
I told Mary to cancel Saturday’s party because I had a business meeting scheduled, but I ____________________ because the day after I talked to her, the meeting was cancelled.
The proposal is due in three hours! You’re really working ________________________, aren’t you?
I guess Jenny’s not going to make it into work today.  Looks like I’ll have to _______________ and do the presentation for her, even though I don’t know much about it.
There’s not enough money for the project, so the boss is _________________________________.
Do you know anymore useful business idioms? Why not leave an example in the comments box.
If you enjoyed this lesson then you’ll love our online lessons. Held in real time, with mother tongue English teachers, 1-1 or in small groups using WizIQ interactive classrooms. Visit our website and sign up for a free demo lesson.

Register for a free demo